Photo Tour!

We are finally getting around to putting up some half decent pictures of the interior for all you who love to take a look around! Maybe one of these days we will get someone in here to do a professional shoot, but for now you will have to deal with my laymen skill and laymen camera. :) I am a big panorama fan so enjoy those wide angle shots! (Pictures make it look so much bigger- if you can believe it.)


Here are shots taken from me sitting on the love seat in the "great room". Our ceiling is made from reclaimed barn board. The barn was built in 1776! The pieces of wood you see above my head (at the very top) are the edge of the overhead storage space. That coupled with the side pillars of storage, makes the love seat a super cozy reading nook!


Below are two shots of the "great room". The full light door makes all the difference!




Here is a shot as you walk in the front door. You can see the nice open area of the great room and also our library/office area. The shelves of this piece were also made from the reclaimed 1776 barn wood.



Here is a closer look at the library/office. A door reclaimed from Dan's Grandmother's house was used as a partition between the closet and shelving. The glass windows allow light into the closet so we can easily see without the need to add a light.



Here is a shot looking down the short "hallway" into the kitchen. Our closet door is to the left. Down on the end is additional kitchen shelving made from the same reclaimed barn wood. Around the corner from that shelf is our bathroom. Stair step storage to the right serves as additional counter space, a means to get up to the loft (part way), and a food and water storage area. 


Our tiny kitchen. :) We used open shelving to maximize space and maintain the "open feel". We have a stainless steel basin that sits into the counter and serves as a sink. It is hidden under the large bamboo cutting board on the counter.


Another angle of the tiny kitchen. We use a small Coleman iceless cooler for our fridge. (Gray unit under the stair storage counter.) The door used as a partition here was also reclaimed from Dan's Grandmother's house. One pane of glass was broken so we decided to remove the glass. The cross bars serve as a nice place to hang towels, spices, etc.


Here is a shot of our seriously tiny bathroom. We have a composting toilet and wood shaving storage to the left. A naturally composting toilet is relatively simple to use. Add wood shavings after every deposit you make. Nature does the rest. Once a week we empty the bucket into a larger compost bin outdoors. Within a year it is fully broken down and ready to use in soil. A third door was used as partition between the closet and bathroom. This door was reclaimed from my Dad's house. You can see all of our clothes in the closet! We painted the door yellow to bring more light and space to the room. We shower either at the gym or at work, but we do have a camp shower setup we can use in the house if need be.


Here is the loft, our tiny bedroom with lots of light!


We love the loft so much! And we love how the library shelving also serves as a partial wall. This gives more privacy to the loft space and also controls the lighting to an extent. I can easily sleep even with the main lights on thanks to that partition and the cubby storage over the head of the bed. These following panorama shots display the difference in lighting well.



Here is a shot from sitting in our bed. All of our windows and door were second hand from Craigslist, allowing us to save a serious amount of money. We LOVE waking up here every day. :)



Here is a shot of our little bedroom nook- the top of the library shelf also doubles as storage and a bedside table for the loft. Sometimes I sit on the edge of the bed and put my computer on the table top so I can work with a view!
Here is a shot looking down from the loft ladder. We still haven't decided if we want to put up a curtain or something to hide the overhead storage.

Another shot looking down from the loft...

Here is a dual level shot, the loft has almost 4 feet of height which allows even Dan, the 6'1" guy, to sit up comfortably.






28 comments:

  1. Love this! You guys did a wonderful job! Makes me excited to start our tiny house soon!

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    1. Thanks so much! Best of luck to you- it's such a fun and amazing experience! :)

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  2. I love what you have done! I am toying with the idea of building one myself, but not having any building experience, I am nervous. For now, I enjoy your experience and thank you too for sharing it! I think it is amazing.

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    1. Thanks so much, Lynne! Don't let the nervousness take over your desire to do this! Even the most complex projects are accomplished one step at a time. With some reading and youtube videos, and having any friends with build experience- you will do great! Remember- building a home is not rocket science- it just takes planning, determination, and perseverance. There are few things more satisfying than waking up in a home you built yourself. :) Good luck to you!

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  3. You two have a beautiful home!! So much history with the various wood and door from each other's homes and the 1776 barn!! That's a WOW!!! To think that that tree had been cut down and made into lumber by a person 240 years ago!! If that lumber could only talk. . . . .
    You have so much to be proud of. Life styles and needs change for all people, and to think that one day should you decide to have a larger home - this can be kept/moved with you - maybe in your back yard for a guest house, your office or even rent it out. You guys are remarkable!!

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    1. Thanks you so much, Suzan! :) You really appreciated every detail- that means a lot to us! And yes, we are quite excited to see the many lives The Pod will take on throughout life...I see it being an art studio, then overtaken as a kids play zone and bunk house... the options are endless! Thanks for reading!

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  4. Wonderful, wonderful! Thanks so much for sharing this with the world. Everything looks nice -- great job "cleaning up for the pictures". I hope you can keep up the momentum. (Resting when you're tired is good, though -- being too tired can cause accidents and injury. Be safe.) Best of luck to you both.

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    1. Thank you so much! And yes, momentum is key right now! We are so close to the finish line, but there's plenty in our way!

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  5. HI I am just starting to design my own tiny house and was wondering what size trailer you guys bought? I love that idea and live in a wet area so really want to raise it off the ground. Thanks!

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    1. Hi Mika, that's awesome that you are planning to go tiny! Best of luck to you in your process- it's a lot of fun and really rewarding! Our house dimensions are 8x16 more or less. We got a heavy duty utility trailer with a 16 foot deck. Thanks for checking us out!

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  6. This looks AWESOME!! We're in the middle of our our build :) Have to take some time off to work and save money - but looking forward to livin the "cozy life" :)

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  7. Very clever 1/2 ladder....I haven't seen anyone else do that. ;-)

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  8. Thanks! We thought about taking the storage all the way up as stairs, but then it would have cut the room up quite a bit and taken away the open feel. With the ladder and the empty window panes of the door partition, you can still see all the way through to the kitchen. Our tiny house is on the tinier side of the scope, so things like that really matter! :)

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  9. Congratulations - what a nice job! Might I ask where and what you do about "showering"?

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    1. Thank you! We have a very basic gravity fed camp shower and basin if we ever were in a pinch and needed to wash off at home, but we typically make use of the shower facilities at our work offices and our gym/school. We will often grab showers at a family's house while we are over visiting too. We have plans to build an outdoor shower for the warmer seasons, but we are still getting settled at our new location. Thanks for taking a look! :)

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  10. Hi Jess, my husband and I really enjoy your blog. The part where you wrote about plumbing is exactly how we are feeling with our tiny house build. we just finished putting up 3 walls so we must decide soon if we want plumbing or not. Im nervous about not having easy access to hot water or water at all. Where do you get your water and how do you wash your dishes, take baths etc. ?
    I just created a blog a few days ago http://ourtinyhouse.weebly.com/
    If there is any advice on how much I should update my blog that would be awesome!
    Thanks! From Hannah and Ryan

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  11. Hi Hannah and Ryan,

    Thanks for following along! We have gone a whole year without traditional plumbing in the house. Overall, we still feel it was worth the trade off. We may be a little more extreme than others, but water conservation was a big one for us, and of course as we said, the logistics of plumbing was another factor. We have carry in carry out water, meaning we use a series of water jugs. We store most of them inside. As we need water for dishes, we heat it on the stove and use a basin to wash and rinse. We use all natural soaps and cleaning materials, so when we are done, we take it outside and "water" plants with it. It's gray water, and usually less than 2 gallons at a time, so we just dump it over plants. We plan to have a gray water plant bin for the future, but we are still getting there. We have a camp shower for the times when we really need to rinse off and we are at the Pod, but most of the time I make use of my local gym, and my work has nice shower facilities. We also grab showers at family homes when we happen to be visiting or stopping by for something.

    I would definitely try to blog at least a couple times a week, and don't feel frustrated if it seems pretty silent at first. I created the blog more for Dan and I to look back on, and for family to check out. For almost a year, that's the only traffic there was- a few friends and family, but then things started to pick up and I realized that this blog has given us a community, an identity, and a means to connect, so I certainly encourage the blog! Best of luck to you! We hope to start doing some videos on how we actually carry out day to day chores. All in good time! We still haven't finished the house yet!

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  12. I just read your entire blog in the last two days. i just have one thing to say to you...fantastic job!!!! I have been hard core researching for almost a year now before I make my big jump to small. My kids are almost grown and my bills are all paid and I just want to be able to do more instead of paying more. You and your hubby are an inspiration. i thank you very much for taking the time to let those of us dreamers a peak into your life. Years ago, I lived in a small overhead pick-up camper while going to school...talk about tiny spaces. I loved every minute of it though and have longed to downsize ever since. If more people lived small and thought big instead of the other way around this country and this planet would be a much better place.Thank you thank you thank you for your time to do this!!

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  13. Thank you so much for your kind words, Jeremy! That was one of our main reasons for doing this- not only to serve as a digital scrapbook for us to look back on, but also as yet another source for others dreaming of the same things. When we started there wasn't a whole lot out there, so we wanted to share our journey and hopefully help and inspire others to go for their dreams! It's really great to hear from like minded people and I truly wish you the best of luck in your journey to return to tiny!

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  14. Your blog is such a gem! My hubs and I just finished putting in the insulation into our 296sq foot space and the whole build has been such an adventure. When I'm feeling a little frazzled with the build it is nice to take a look at these pictures and remind myself that one day (hopefully soon) we will get to wake up in our tiny home sleeping nook!

    seattleventure.blogspot.com if you'd like to check it out.

    Cheers,
    OV

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    1. Thanks so much, Oriana! I'm glad we can provide some "pick me up" when you needed it most! I agree that a TH build is an amazing adventure and I wouldn't take ours back for anything, but I also know it can wear you down at times. Keep on truckin! You will get there! Once you are done the insulation and start the finish work- you will definitely get a new gust of wind to your sails! It's so much fun to see the inside develop! Best of luck to you!! I will be peaking in now and then! :)

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  15. Hi jess, just a comment on the window shot near the beginning of this article. the tie back hardware actually goes side ways to hold back the length of the curtains, you may all ready know that, but as an "older" reader with some experience at hanging curtains, drapes, etc and learning the hard way, thought i'd just pass my learning on. god bless.

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  16. The roof looks flat, is it? And if it is, how does that work?

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  17. Lovely.I like it that it looks like my house only smaller.I see a lot of overdesigned tiny houses that don't appeal to everyday people like myself.Thanks for keeping it real.☺

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  18. Such a very beautiful house. thanks for shearing the great idea.
    Plots for sale in Paragon City

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  19. Love this! My favorite feature (believe it or not) is the built in crate for you pet!! Sweet!

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